Glycemic Load of 100+ Common Foods

Description

The chart represents the the glycemic load per serving:
To understand a food's complete effect on blood sugar, you need to know both how quickly the food makes glucose enter the bloodstream, and how much glucose it will deliver. A separate value called glycemic load does that. It gives a more accurate picture of a food's real-life impact on blood sugar. The glycemic load is determined by multiplying the grams of a carbohydrate in a serving by the glycemic index, then dividing by 100. A glycemic load of 10 or below is considered low; 20 or above is considered high. Watermelon, for example, has a high glycemic index (80). But a serving of watermelon has so little carbohydrate (6 grams) that its glycemic load is only 5.1 The data can be found in the Harvard Health Publications article Glycemic index and glycemic load for 100+ foods: Measuring carbohydrate effects can help glucose management